My name is Tamsin Barks. I became a member of IAP in 2004, at the very beginning of 3 boom years for property investment.

I invested the money my father left me when he died, and on IAP’s advice, the equity from my home. I simply wanted to secure my future.
Now I am fighting for justice and intend to help as many other members as I can.

About Tamsin

My Background

I am a former vet. In 2003 I was working in emergency clinics. Before this I worked for pharmaceutical companies analysing clinical trails to make sure drugs were safe; later I was on the committee that first established Veterinary Practice Standards in the UK and for many years I worked as an inspector for the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. I now represent IAP members on the Creditors Committee of IAP.

My IAP Story

IAP advised me to buy 7 properties, to “spread the risk” they told me to buy in Florida and Spain as well as the UK. IAP lied to me about the rental incomes, the discounts, and the market values of all 7 properties.

Publicly IAP claimed their members made 114% return, this was another lie; by 2007 it was clear that I and many other IAP members had been badly misled and lost vast sums of money.

In 2007 I discovered by accident that IAP been taking up to $40,000/per unit in secret commission and on further investigation found out that my neighbours who did not buy through IAP paid $60,000 less than me for an identical unit. I immediately challenged Anthony McKay (Director and COO) to show me the IAP due diligence valuations – he was unable to provide a single RICS valuation for any one of my seven properties.

Tony McKay told me he would “put things right”, he “worked on” my complaint with the other directors Jim Moore and Brad Rosser, and I had meetings with director Maria Gifford .

Officially IAP said: “We gave huge amounts of help to make her portfolio the best possible. We’ve done everything humanly possible to help her. We have gone to the ends of the earth to make sure all her needs are met.” – this is just another lie. I had lost over £350,000 in boom times – this was 2007 before the credit crunch.

I began to contact other members through internet forums.

Press

Realising that my story was typical, I allowed it to be published in the National Newspapers to warn any potential newcomers. I turned out to picket their local “free workshops”.

For the last 4 years I have represented fellow members on the creditors committee of IAP.

I am a very determined person: in 2010 when the liquidator was unable to trace Jim Moore (he told them he was in Switzerland!) I tracked Jim down to his Surrey millionaire’s residence – he didn’t come to the door – so I went round the back of the house and found him eating his tea!

10,000 members and a £200 million turnover

IAP had 10,000 members. I have contacted over 3,000 fellow members. Everyday I hear stories of the devastating effect IAP has had on the lives of so many members.  I am determined to bring the people who masterminded IAP to justice.

The law is clear Directors can be held personally responsible for fraud. In 2006 ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) rulings found that Inside Track Seminars breached codes of Honesty and Truthfulness.

Now I am taking the first legal action to be bought against the former Directors of IAP:

I am very grateful for your support. Over £200,000 of legal work has been carried out to bring the case this far. Having spent all that remained of my own money (£30,000), I now need to raise £20,000 for legal counsel as I embark on the next stage of the case. I believe that together we can raise this money.

If you want to support this fight and make sure we are successful please send just £100, £30 or £50 ( this is a small fraction of the sum you paid to attend just one day of Jim Moore‘s seminar), It will help bring him to justice. This money will be used for expert legal counsel to make sure we are successful in pushing this case through court, I will fight on for all of us.

We are fast becoming a force to be reckoned with: I believe these people can and will be held to account.